Imagining Somewheres  is an interdisciplinary undertaking, combining visual art, virtual reality, and decolonial theory to explore hope beyond the known and solidarities across difference.  This two-fold project – consisting of an abstract VR piece, an installation, and  a written thesis  – investigates obstruction as a beginning and its role in future-building.

Imagining Somewheres

artistic research, Experimental storytelling, VR
  Imagining Somewheres  is an interdisciplinary undertaking, combining visual art, virtual reality, and decolonial theory to explore hope beyond the known and solidarities across difference.  This two-fold project – consisting of an abstract VR piece, an installation, and  a written thesis  – investigates obstruction as a beginning and its role in future-building.

Imagining Somewheres is an interdisciplinary undertaking, combining visual art, virtual reality, and decolonial theory to explore hope beyond the known and solidarities across difference.

This two-fold project – consisting of an abstract VR piece, an installation, and a written thesis – investigates obstruction as a beginning and its role in future-building.

 In March–April 2019, the  full VR installation  was shown at  Skånes konstförening  as part of  The appearance and disappearance of futures and pasts  exhibition.  In 2018, I collaborated with Sydney-based architect/designer  Shuang Wu  on   sister/scapes  , which featured the VR portion of this work.

In March–April 2019, the full VR installation was shown at Skånes konstförening as part of The appearance and disappearance of futures and pasts exhibition.

In 2018, I collaborated with Sydney-based architect/designer Shuang Wu on sister/scapes, which featured the VR portion of this work.

As my master’s thesis for the Visual Culture program at Lund University, this project critically examines raced and gendered embodiment, solidarities, and radical hope.

I completed Imagining Somewheres with help from the Chinese American Museum Los Angeles, producer Michi Lantz Jörgensen, The Humanities Lab, and Professor Floyd Cheung (Smith College).